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Make me an instrument of your peacehttps://assets.mennonites.org/Downloads/FIA_Aug_C17-073_WEB.pdfMake me an instrument of your peaceEnglish

 

 

Make me an instrument of your peaceAugust 2017GP0|#af594497-9c88-4adb-942c-d3e255a3c844;L0|#0af594497-9c88-4adb-942c-d3e255a3c844|Faith in Action;GTSet|#bb9274b4-45fe-43f1-8b69-3df0b933cdb0;GPP|#6c45e146-a54c-4766-8d77-e57ac1def274;GPP|#a82c2124-212e-4f7a-b626-9a0c5a3534c2;GPP|#96e4d92c-656e-45f6-9cd5-ab8aed108e3chttps://www.mennonitemission.net/resources/publications/beyond/Faith in action/368/Make me an instrument of your peaceMake me an instrument of your peaceFaith in Action

 

 

<p>​Munny’s* head hurt. The yelling. The screaming. In his small home, he couldn’t get away from it. Munny loved his parents, but hated when they argued. He wanted them to find better ways of resolving conflict. </p><p>As in many cultures, “domestic violence is a real issue [in these communities],” said Samuel*, whose work in Southeast Asia is supported by Mennonite Mission Network. Samuel and his wife, Rabecca*, are founders of three peace schools for children ages 6–12 at the request of people in three different regions. Children learn educational basics as well as the benefits of peacemaking as a community-building skill, and English. In this same spirit of peacemaking, they also recite the <em>Prayer of Saint Francis</em> daily. </p><p>But it’s not just the children like Munny who are learning about peace; these children are teaching their parents, too! </p><p>One day after studying the <em>Prayer of Saint Francis</em>, Munny placed a copy of the prayer on the family’s kitchen table in hopes that his parents would find it. In Southeast Asia, anything more direct would be disrespectful. One day, after a loud argument, the parents found it. Although conflict still arises, families are learning healthier ways to deal with it. </p><p>“Our peace centers benefit the entire community.” said Samuel. Not only do the children carry these lessons to the larger community, but the schools provide a space to train community leaders to continue this important work. </p><p><em>*Name and locations have been changed for safety.</em><br></p><p><br></p><p><strong>PRAY</strong> for Munny and children like him, that their families will adopt healthy ways of resolving conflict and their homes can be safe places. </p><p><strong>PRAY</strong> for the leaders of these communities in Southeast Asia that they can be empowered as peacemakers.<br></p><p><br></p><h2>6 lessons learned from 100 years of mission<br></h2><p>We, Mennonite Mission Network, have learned a lot the last 100 years. Below we highlight only 6 important points of what could be many more. Summarized from <em>The “M” word: My personal awakening to God’s work</em> by Paula Killough. </p><ol><li>Following the path of faithfulness is not for the faint of heart and does not happen overnight. </li><li>The kingdom of God must be embodied in cultural forms. </li><li>Local knowledge and wisdom matter. </li><li>Women are changing the church. </li><li>One hundred years of faithful service by North Americans can be held up alongside pain inflicted through power and privilege. </li><li>Learning to be a gracious guest can be difficult yet extremely important for those from the dominant culture.<br></li></ol>

 

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​Munny’s* head hurt. The yelling. The screaming. In his small home, he couldn’t get away from it. Munny loved his parents, but hated when they argued. He wanted them to find better ways of resolving conflict. 

As in many cultures, “domestic violence is a real issue [in these communities],” said Samuel*, whose work in Southeast Asia is supported by Mennonite Mission Network. Samuel and his wife, Rabecca*, are founders of three peace schools for children ages 6–12 at the request of people in three different regions. Children learn educational basics as well as the benefits of peacemaking as a community-building skill, and English. In this same spirit of peacemaking, they also recite the Prayer of Saint Francis daily. 

But it’s not just the children like Munny who are learning about peace; these children are teaching their parents, too! 

One day after studying the Prayer of Saint Francis, Munny placed a copy of the prayer on the family’s kitchen table in hopes that his parents would find it. In Southeast Asia, anything more direct would be disrespectful. One day, after a loud argument, the parents found it. Although conflict still arises, families are learning healthier ways to deal with it. 

“Our peace centers benefit the entire community.” said Samuel. Not only do the children carry these lessons to the larger community, but the schools provide a space to train community leaders to continue this important work. 

*Name and locations have been changed for safety.


PRAY for Munny and children like him, that their families will adopt healthy ways of resolving conflict and their homes can be safe places. 

PRAY for the leaders of these communities in Southeast Asia that they can be empowered as peacemakers.


6 lessons learned from 100 years of mission

We, Mennonite Mission Network, have learned a lot the last 100 years. Below we highlight only 6 important points of what could be many more. Summarized from The “M” word: My personal awakening to God’s work by Paula Killough. 

  1. Following the path of faithfulness is not for the faint of heart and does not happen overnight. 
  2. The kingdom of God must be embodied in cultural forms. 
  3. Local knowledge and wisdom matter. 
  4. Women are changing the church. 
  5. One hundred years of faithful service by North Americans can be held up alongside pain inflicted through power and privilege. 
  6. Learning to be a gracious guest can be difficult yet extremely important for those from the dominant culture.
Make me an instrument of your peace
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